PRESS
NEW MEXICO TRAVELER Cover Story 2004


Dan Namingha and Arlo Namingha build on the mighty heritage of their famous artist ancestors
 



written by Suzanne Deats
photography by Herbert Lotz,
Lynn Lown and Joe Burgess


Generations of Indian Art

NIMAN FINE ART IN SANTA FE IS THE PRIMARY EXHIBIT SPACE FOR THE LATEST TWO MEMBERS OF A MAJOR Native American art family. Tewa-Hopi artist Dan Namingha is internationally famous. Now his son, Arlo, has weighed in with his own distinctive art.

Both men are descendants of Nampeyo (1860-1942), the first Indian artist to be nationally recognized and acclaimed.Nampeyo lived on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona. She created pottery designs based on the shards she found at Sikyatki, an earlyTewa settlement. Her name became synonymous with Hopi pottery. Nampeyo’s daughters and granddaughters continued the tradition. Her great-granddaughter, Dextra Nampeyo Quotskuyva, who is Dan’s mother and Arlo’s grandmother, is the best known of the Nampeyo potters working
today. Dextra still lives at Hopi and produces highly sought-after pottery in her own style, based on the Nampeyo traditions. Both Dan and Arlo Namingha employ Tewa-Hopi design, community life, ceremony, and architecture as their themes.
 
Above: Niman Fine Art Showroom
in downtown Santa Fe.

Left: Dancer #1, Bronze Edition of 15,
21" x 6" x 6",
Arlo Namingha (c) 2002
Middle: Butterfly Maiden I, Bronze Edition of 15,
17 1/2" x 9" x 7,
Arlo Namingha (c) 2002
Right: Symbolism, Bronze Edition of 12,
26" x 14" x 10",
Dan Namingha (c) 2002
 
PASSAGE XXXVI
PASSAGE XXXVII
PASSAGE XXXVI
     
PASSAGE & CARDINAL DIRECTIONS #5
PASSAGE & CARDINAL DIRECTIONS #7
PASSAGE & CARDINAL DIRECTIONS #8
     
WREN KACHINA
PASSAGE XXXII
PASSAGE XXXV
 
Above: The nine 2003 original works by Dan Namingha are all 24” x 24”, Acrylic on Canvas
 
Both are descendants of Nampeyo (1860-1942) the first Indian artist to be nationally recognized and acclaimed.Both also incorporate the distinctive forms of the high mesas and vast distances of their ancestral lands, with their arching skies and ever-changing clouds. However, there are marked differences in how they interpret these elements. Dan Namingha, a formidable painter and sculptor, shatters the formal elements into graphic fragments, then reassembles them into endless, kaleidoscopic compositions that